Strong suggestions for structurally combatting online harassment

Craig Newmark asked for suggestions and here’s some things I came up with:

  • Create block functions that actually work and completely block all interaction with a user.
  • Create a mute function that doesn’t get tangled in block.
  • Respond to abuse reports, generating at minimum an inter-user block, but that when they actually involve any kind of escalation by the abuser, a block of that user from the service (or other highly quarantining action).
  • Encourage use of pseudonyms rather than complete anonymity, if only to encourage a stable handle to block by.
  • Spam-fighting-like statistical models to detect outlier behavior — repeated first contacts by someone who’s been reported as harassing is one particularly significant sign. Being proactive and confirming with the harassed user might even make sense. “Is @username bothering you?”
  • Allow communities to segment when possible, rather than encouraging all users to share one single graph.
  • At least three-level privacy controls per account: Public, initial contacts restricted to friends, and all contact restricted to friends.
  • Create transparent policies and processes, so we can know how effective the service will be in supporting us if harassed, rather than shouting into the void, wondering if anyone actually reads these reports. If the policies or processes change, say something!
  • Do use decoy selections in report abuse forms, but keep it simple: “This is annoying” vs “this is dangerous” can be differentiated, and the decisions about how to handle those should be different.
  • Don’t patronize the people you’re trying to protect. Leave choices in the hands of those needing protection when it’s possible. For tools for protection have downsides (social cost, monetary cost, opportunity cost), let those needing protection opt in or opt out. If the tools are independent of each other, let them be chosen à la carte.

And a rule of thumb:

If you spend less time fighting harassment than you do fighting spam, your priorities are wrong. If you take spam seriously and don’t take harassment seriously, you’re making it worse.

An unofficial mission statement for the #node.js IRC channel

This is the mission statement I seek to uphold when I provide support on the Freenode #node.js channel.

To support users of node.js and their related projects to create a collaborative,
creative, diverse, interested, and inter-generational sustainable culture of
programmers of all skill levels, with room and encouragement to grow.

One of the great criticisms of IRC channels for software support is that they’re often the blind leading the blind. Experts have little direct incentive to jump in with half-formed questions, and it takes some real skill to elicit good questions that can be answered accurately. There’s some incentive for some members to use questions to opine their favorite tools, and to show off clever answers not necessarily in the best interests of the person asking.

The other problem is times of day — American nights and weekends have a lull, and questions asked then are often left to the void. Hard to answer questions — vague and incomplete ones especially — are the easiest to ignore. Let’s do the hard work to encourage good discussion, even among the less carefully asked, hurried questions.

We can do this and be unusual among technical channels. We’ve the critical mass to do it, and we’ve a great culture to start with. Let’s keep it up!

A Tale of Two Webs

originally posted on Medium

There’s a sharp divide between the people who make the Web, all of us, everywhere, and Silicon Valley Tech.

It’s a cultural divide I’ve seen come up again and again and again in discussions of tech culture.

On one side, we have the entitled, white frat-boy mentality of a lot of Silicon Valley start-up companies, with a culture going back years in a cycle of venture capital, equity, buy-out or IPO, repeat; a culture often isolated from failure by the fact that even the less amazing exits are still a solid paycheck. I suggest that this grew out of American industrial culture, the magnates of the nineteenth century turned inward into a mill of people all jockeying to be the next break-out success.

On the balance, we’ve the people who make the Web outside those silos. The lone designer at a traditional media publisher, doing the hard work to adapt paper print styles to the rapid publishing and infinite yet strangely shaped spaces of browser windows. The type designers who’ve now made their way out of lead blocks and work in Bézier curves. The scientist at CERN who realized that if every document had an address, scientific information would form a web of information. They don’t labor in a Tech Industry, they labor in their industries — all of them — connected by a common web.

In media, it appears as one giant “Tech industry”, and perhaps this is bolstered by the fact that a great number of people don’t know what a lot of us do — a software developer and a designer are so much the same job to someone who’s not paying attention to the details.

And yet, on Wednesday, a great many people turned their Twitter avatars purple in support of a family who’s lost a child to cancer. Looking over who they were, something dawned on me: They were some of the best and brightest on the Web. Authors, developers, designers. The people who know and know of @meyerweb are the people who make the Web. This is the Web I care about, have always cared about. It’s the web of caring and sharing, of writing and collaborating. We take care of our own.

In skimming over the people who’ve gone purple, I notice one thing: The bios that list locations say things like “Cleveland, OH”, “Chicago, IL”, and “Cambridge, MA”. “Bethesda, MD”, “Phoenix, AZ”, “Nashville, TN”. “1.3, 103.4″. Their titles are “type designer”, “map maker”, “standards editor”, “librarian”, “archivist”.

And far, far down the list, a few “San Francisco, CA” and “San Jose, CA”, “Software Developer” and “Full-stack engineer”.

LG_T

LG_T:

izs:

Erasure is a complicated subject.

I was born onto a bed of privilege. I’m of white European descent, and my immigrant ancestors came over the ocean long enough ago that my parents could speak without any trace of dialect to the teachers at my well-funded suburban public school. They both had…

Every bit of this.

portraitsofboston:      “I dropped out of school in the third…



portraitsofboston:

     “I dropped out of school in the third grade, so I could focus on dancing. I’ve never followed a straight path, and I’ve always been a little different my whole life. I don’t like to blend in. I don’t think it suits me. I was ostracized twice as a child. The biggest thing I learned was to be myself because no matter how hard you try to be someone people want you to be, it won’t work because you are lying.”

Yay for Unschoolers!

Unbelievable

Unbelievable:

thisfeliciaday:

zoekeating:

Dear Listeners,

My husband Jeff has been sick with a mysterious illness for several months. It’s not so mysterious any more. My man, my best friend, my partner-in-crime for 16 years has cancer. All. Fucking. Over. Lungs, brain, liver, bones.

We’re at the hospital. He is a warrior. We are…

This is so sad. I love Zoe Keating’s work, she makes the cello something new and amazing to listen to, so artistic and innovative. Check out her work if you’ve never heard it, and support if you like it.